beautone:

C.L.R. James & E.P. Thompson Conversation on British Television Show “Talking History” (1983, 50 min)

Reblogged from Beautone

withah:

Like Wangechi Mutu but … sweeter. Firelei Báez is my newest obsession, as seen @ Fore.

withah:

Like Wangechi Mutu but … sweeter. Firelei Báez is my newest obsession, as seen @ Fore.

Reblogged from with ah
beautone:

Ellington At The Keyboard. Photograph of Duke Ellington for an Olivetti advertisement. Undated. (via Milton Glaser Design Study Center And Archives: Images from the Henry Wolf Collection)

beautone:

Ellington At The Keyboard. Photograph of Duke Ellington for an Olivetti advertisement. Undated. (via Milton Glaser Design Study Center And Archives: Images from the Henry Wolf Collection)

Reblogged from Beautone
… And yet it has survived and produced the drum the dance the mask survival family: omens of a vitality which if we can’t yet understand,
we can still not ignore.
— Kamau Brathwaite “Dialect and Dialectic”
In preparation  for my upcoming to travels to Dakar, Senegal, I have been digging through my collection and came across this track off of Archie Shepp’s double record blasé/live at the panafrican festival. Recorded at the 1969 Algiers Pan-African Festival (festival panafricain d’Alger), “We Have Come Back” features  Jeanne Lee (vocals), Lester Bowie (trumpet, flugelhorn), Dave Burrell (piano), Sunny Murray (drums), and Shepp (tenor saxophone). It opens with an incantatory Shepp: 
"We are still black and we have come back. Nous sommes revenus. We have come back, and brought back to our land, Africa, the music of Africa [applause]. Jazz is a black power. Jazz is a black power. Jazz is an African power. Jazz is an African music [constant applause]. We have come back. " 
"Nous sommes revenus" carries the accent of the exiled, U.S.-brand of black nationalism that was hailed, harbored, and celebrated in Algeria in the late 1960s. The Black Panther Party delegation and Eldridge Cleaver’s celebrity, which both graced the festival, were part of a larger translation of political contexts that articulated both black international solidarity and the extended displacement of diaspora. The festival itself was considered as a radicalized response to the 1966 First World Festival of Negro Arts in Dakar that was hosted by the then poet-president Léopold Sédar Senghor. Although it may seem slightly anachronistic, I can’t think about 1966 without listening to 1969. 
No doubt, there will be more on Shepp and Jeanne Lee to come. 

We Have Come Back - Archie Shepp

In preparation  for my upcoming to travels to Dakar, Senegal, I have been digging through my collection and came across this track off of Archie Shepp’s double record blasé/live at the panafrican festival. Recorded at the 1969 Algiers Pan-African Festival (festival panafricain d’Alger), “We Have Come Back” features  Jeanne Lee (vocals), Lester Bowie (trumpet, flugelhorn), Dave Burrell (piano), Sunny Murray (drums), and Shepp (tenor saxophone). It opens with an incantatory Shepp:

"We are still black and we have come back. Nous sommes revenus. We have come back, and brought back to our land, Africa, the music of Africa [applause]. Jazz is a black power. Jazz is a black power. Jazz is an African power. Jazz is an African music [constant applause]. We have come back. " 

"Nous sommes revenus" carries the accent of the exiled, U.S.-brand of black nationalism that was hailed, harbored, and celebrated in Algeria in the late 1960s. The Black Panther Party delegation and Eldridge Cleaver’s celebrity, which both graced the festival, were part of a larger translation of political contexts that articulated both black international solidarity and the extended displacement of diaspora. The festival itself was considered as a radicalized response to the 1966 First World Festival of Negro Arts in Dakar that was hosted by the then poet-president Léopold Sédar Senghor. Although it may seem slightly anachronistic, I can’t think about 1966 without listening to 1969. 

No doubt, there will be more on Shepp and Jeanne Lee to come. 


We Have Come Back - Archie Shepp

"Panorama," by Aimé Césaire, Tropiques February 1944, no. 10.

This land is suffering from a repressed revolution.

  Our revolution has been stolen from us.

*

the worst mistake would be to believe that the West Indies devoid of strong political parties are devoid of powerful will. We know very well what we want.

Liberty, dignity, justice, Christmas torched.

*

the condition for a rebirth or a birth cannot be stressed enough: an overthrow of the economy and of society. The Fourth Republic must come.

*

one day history will severely judge those men who in three centuries of unprecedented ease, on the world’s most beautiful island, could construct nothing but this monument of obscurantism, sloth and jesuitism that is Martiniquan capitalism.

*

one of the elements, the principal element of the Caribbean malaise, is the existence on these islands of a homogenous group, of a people which for three centuries has sought to express itself and to create.

*

slavery weighs heavily upon us, we know .but to attribute our present poverty to this alone is to forget that under the slave regime the nigger [nègre] was magnificent. The better to treat him as a beast, they had to make him a beast. They broke his body. They tormented his soul. And the nigger [nègre] resisted. Resisted the whip, professors in their mortarboards, theologians, sadists. Contempt was met with humour—that force that the dour Indian never knew. The gloom of false science was combated with ringing laughter. Cruelty was sometimes combated with patience, sometimes with revolt, never with resignation.

            Only those who don’t know what Africa was would be surprised at this.

Wast empires. Monarchies full of splendor. Strange and beautiful ceremonies. Unusual and pure relations. An unsurpassed dignity and sincerity. And the nigger [nègre] overflowed with life and strength. And with riches. Rich with sensuality and spirituality: Rich…And he braced himself, struck out, bit…Tamed he never was.

A powerful page from Michelet:

            “What delayed the Renaissance and rendered it almost impossible from the thirteenth to the sixteenth centuries was not that every vigorous drive to become manifest was destroyed by iron and fire; others would have sprung up from the same base. But the artificial world of the ponderous mediocrity was created over this productive base, a leaden world, which kept all nobility of life and thought, all grandeur and ingegno, submerged.”

            What makes the Renaissance impossible is that, for three centuries, all thought here has been profaned, all independence broken, all boldness defied, all pride debased. And at the same time all the cowardice and baseness is honoured, extolled, promoted, encouraged, rewarded.

*

You tremble when you think of the quality of souls brought up here over nearly a century. A century of underhand slavery, resignations and individual and collective cowardice.

            A ferocious egoism.

            A repulsive conformism.

            A century after the abolition of slavery you could not imagine the degree of indifference and scorn that the bourgeoisie of this land professes for the black proletariat.

*

It may be conceded that 90 percent of the young people turned out here by school (alas!), family, es family and EVERTHING ELSE, EVERYTHING ELSE especially, are in a state of moral torpor bordering on imbecility.

*

What has the youth been offered during these last fifty years? Positions. Trades, Words. Not one feeling. Not one idea.

*

If the great and healthy anger of the people does not (as it did a century ago) stand in its way, we will march straight ahead to the logical conclusion of three centuries of Caribbean history: the triumph of total flunkeyism.

*

When the essential problems (the weight of facts discourage the elation of the spirit, a society is at a pre-revolutionary stage.

*

The Martiniquan revolution will be made in the name of bread, of course; but also in the name of fresh air and poetry (which amount to the same thing).

*

I tell you we are choking.

*

The principle of a healthy Caribbean politics: open the windows. More air. More air.

*

This I condemn any idea of Caribbean Independence.

*

…But this is not in order to bark with dogs.

*

…But this is not so as to cast my pearls before swine. Martiniquan dependency, willed, calculated, reasoned as much as sentimental, will be neither dis-grace nor sub-grace.

*

I only know one France. That of the Revolution. That of Toussaint L’Ouverture. Too bad for the gothic cathedral.

*

We want to be able to live passionately.

*

And in the last resort the resolution will come from the blood of this land. And this blood has it tolerances and its intolerances, its patiences and its impatiences, its resignations and its brutalities, its whims and its forbearances, its stillnesses and its tempests, its calms and its whirlwinds.

            And this is what, in the end, will act.

            This kind of blood does not cast voes.

This kind of blood reinvigorates and strangles.